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healthcare. >>> some have called it the civil rights issue of our generation. now this legal challenge lies in the hands of the u.s. supreme court. the high court has announced it will hear two constitution proposal challenges to federal and state laws. joining me now from new york, joanne shane and mary jo kennedy. they have been together for 29 years and they were married in july of last year. the first day same-sex marriage was legal in new york state. thank you guys for joining us. >> thank you. >> thank you. thanks for having us. >> before i get into all this, did you ever think in your lifetime -- from the attorneys who are presenting this case, who have been fighting this case, a liberal and a conservative and a republican. and they both say it is a civil rights issue, it's not a left versus right thing, it is a civil rights issue and it's a civil rights issue of our generation. >> we absolutely agree with that. this is it. this is the civil rights issue of our generation. and it is so because when a group of people are denied the same rights that other people have because of who the
, and same sex marriage is simply an issue of civil rights. cnn's gloria borger tells us how the story of this political odd couple began. >> we now need to resolve this election. >> reporter: it was the historic case that decided the presidency and divided the nation. olson and boyce were the ones on the steps of the supreme court battling it out. that was then. this is now. on the streets of new york, they're talking anything but the law. >> it is called crazy heart, jeff bridges. >> i know, i know. i haven't seen that. i want to see that, though, and avatar. >> reporter: yethey have come a long way. let me play a game with you. great lawyer. >> ted. >> david. >> reporter: that's too easy. the adversaries are now friends, really good friends. and when we asked to meet with them, they suggested a personal spot. david boyce's apartment in new york city. if anybody had said to me nine years ago that i would about to be interviewing the two men who fought each other tooth and nail in bush versus gore on the same side of a constitutional fight, i would have said, are you crazy? >> actuall
events of the arab spring or the wisconsin statehouse or who lived through the civil rights movement or the anti-war movement of the '60s and the '70s can doubt their importance. in short, i think, we're going to have to put it all on the line. so allow me to conclude, if i can, by reading to you a few pages from the book. these are the -- this is a section that address how system change can come to america, and they reflect the theory of change that runs throughout the book. the journey to america the possible begins when enough americans have come to three important conclusions. the first is that something is powerfully wrong with our overall political economy. the operating system in which, on which our country now runs. that system is now routinely generating terrible results and is failing us across a broad front. the second conclusion follows from the first, it's the imperative of system change, of building a new political economy that routinely delivers good results for people in place and planet. and the third conclusion is that contrary to what one frequently hears, a better
's current president jacob zuma, who met with the civil rights icon this morning. mandela was admitted to a hospital for testing. this is video from his 94th birthday earlier this year. few additional details about his condition are available. worshippers concerned about mandela have gathered at a johannesburg church. which has been a center for anti- apartheid protests. >> there are plenty of holiday-themed events happening around the bay today. here are just a few. it's snow day in berkeley's gourmet ghetto. starting at 10 a.m. parents can take their kids to visit the snow queen and work on craft projects. that's free, at 16 - 73 shattuck avenue in berkeley. >> then at 4 p.m. festivities begin down in santa clara's great america amusement park. this weekend is chinese and hispanic cultures weekend. santa will be there, along with dancers, magicians, a laser light show and more. also in the south bay, an event for the second night of hanukkah the jewish community center of silicon valley is hosting a menorah lighting. that's at 4 p.m. at the santana row shopping center on olin avenue.
for civil rights. we'll tell you how japanese-americans heroically overcame their darkest hour. >> it's been called the most powerful office in the world, and you can get a chance to sit in it. >> stay with me now. some almond milk and spinach -- i promise you it's delicious. >> in "speak of the week," we'll find out just how well you know your parents. >> to go from this... to this is pretty easy if you know how. we'll get some great makeup tips from the experts teen vogue. >> all that and more, next on "teen kids news." >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> we've all heard the story of iron man. he's the comic-book superhero who chose to help mankind after suffering near-fatal injuries. nicole introduces us to iron heart, a real-life hero who's helping others after he, too, suffered near-fatal injuries. >> it was just a regular summer day, and i was crossing a local intersection on my way home from some practice, and i was struck in my driver's side door by a speeding dump truck, and the injuries were catastrophic. >> brian was 18 y
of a policy and civil rights renaissance. we have seen extraordinary leadership from other parts of government already. we -- don't we judge presidents by whether they stand tube the moment of history in which they live. we have seen president obama step up to this issue, gay marriage. >> "don't ask, don't tell" now saying he won't enforce doma. >> our military has stepped up. >> even the marines are doing a great job. >> even the marines are. now, we have to see, will the supreme court also keep pace in our time with the other major institutions. >> chad, you're the export. i supported it, my wife has for years. hrc, you have a hell of a great name, human rights campaign, great name. >> life, liberty and property cannot be denied except by due process of law. you have to break a law to lose your liberty. it has to be a crime. you can't be denied liberty, your thoughts on that issue and how that can be used in this constitution. >> that's exactly right. is there no state right. the plaintiffs in this case, the fundamental right to marriage. chris, oftentimes, we get lost a bit talking about th
the transition only under that coercion and duress. >> i think you are exactly right. this is an example of radical social change that happens under top-down pressure. sometimes it happens by movements like civil rights moment or right to vote for women in this country and sometimes it has to come from topdown change. when that topdown change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. by in large they are not perceived to be effectively active and enforced so the exploiter does not have to adapt too much or adapt just enough to avoid identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. in a particular way of asking that question, i would like to hear you say what your study on the shrimp supply chain suggests about an appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if
of sight, with no public hearings. several public interest groups, civil rights organizations and labor unions opposed the move, and last week, senator bernie sanders and several of his colleagues called on chairman genachowski to hold off. bernie sanders is an outspoken opponent of media consolidation. he sees it as a threat to democracy. once the mayor of burlington, vermont, he served 16 years in the house of representatives and was recently re-elected to his second term in the senate. he's the longest serving independent in the history of congress. he was in new york earlier this week and we met for this interview. welcome. good to see you again. >> good to be with you, bill. >> this is a strong letter, inspired one of your colleagues in the senate says, by you. what's the beef? >> what the chairman of the fcc is now talking about is making a bad situation much worse by loosening up the cross-ownership rules, which means now that a media giant, one of the big companies, whether it's murdoch's news corp. or anyone else, will be able to own major television stations, a newspaper, and
signed the civil rights act. ronald reagan forged a bipartisan compromise on tax reform in his sixth. and bill clinton did the same with the balanced budget act that put the country on road to a surplus in 1997. send in your questions on twitter and james and mary are going to stick around to answer your tweets for this week's web extra. >>> that is all for us today. thank you for sharing part of your sunday with us. check out "world news" with david muir tonight and i'll see you tomorrow on "good morning america." >> in the news, growing safety concerns after three murders in a 24 hour span. and a charity known for collecting donations during the holidays is at the center of a controversy in berkeley. >> good morning. we are looking at lots of sunshine. we aren't looking at it, but we are going to see a beautiful day today. a dryer and warmer air mass arrives today. here we go. you can see all the sunshine downtown san francisco at 49 degrees. i'll tell you how warm it will get when the abc7 news at nine starts in
on the federal level. do you think the days of same-sex marriage being not recognized, unrecognized as a civil right, are coming to an end? >> i think the supreme court will make the decision. prior to this election, every vote has only been it's only made it through by a legislator, not the vote of the people. in california, the people voted it down. we'll see from the supreme court. >> how do you see it? >> marriage equality is part of america's future. we saw that in state after state in the last election. the supreme court will take up the issue, and i hope that they understand as most of us do that this is part of our future. marriage equality and the equal treatment of people who have made this decision is part of what america is all about. >> final point, senator durbin. susan rice. will she be the president's secretary of state nominee and could she get confirmed in the senate at this point? >> i can't say that because the president has not told me what his decision will be. there have been two excellent names mentioned, ambassador rice and my colleague, senator kerry. either one of th
to get them until the 70's for the most part. one of the great victories as it turns out of the civil rights movements and its impact on the democratic party a fiscal crisis with the state in the 1970's, a tax revolt, inflation, except for a. of finance and discipline. so you can have an expansion of state programs and more. the balance of forces. a great victory in the 1970's is to stop the banks redlining in terms of loans. community reinvestment act. a major reform. no question. you try to solve the terrible urban plight of the american city by giving the banks to lend and that integrate them into the financial system. very small at the stage. the kennedy reinvestment act is fairly kosher and terms of the way in which it's making those loans. by the 1990's, there is an explosion of mortgage debt and to black communities, enormous pride that the world is trying to buy secondary mortgages. the treasury proudly says so. and then every shares turned to business. the congressional inquiry and the crisis shows that 10,000 people in florida who were selling mortgages and florida have the
. not only was he known for intricate rhythms, also he was a huge civil rights advocate and activist, i should say, as well. and he was one of the handful of white musicians, jazz musicians, in the 1950s. and you know, let's take a listen here of some of his songs. ♪ >> amazing. amazing. so i could just sit and listen to him all over again, for the entire show. i want to move on because i want to talk about we said that niemeye reshg w niemeyer was 104 but that's nothing compared to the world's oldest woman. >> bessie, who passed away at 116 and he's a georgia native. the world's oldest woman lived to be 122 and she's a french woman. all these individuals regardless of their circumstances and what they did in their lives, they left a legacy and that's the thing to remember here and they left their footprints and fingerprints all over their work. >> can you imagine, 122? >> i don't know. what would you do? >> whatever i wanted. 122, i'd do whatever i wanted and say whatever i wanted. all right. thank you. appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> how is the nfl playing with the recent player tr
of marriage, kenji. when loving -- it's actually post '64 civil rights act. past the voting rights act. these other issues had been taken care of in terms of legislation. but there was still the need to redress the issue of interracial marriage. >> they forget this try cot mi between the social rights. the idea of rights of association as being the last untouchable place where equality norms would penetrate, i think it's really the tact that marriage is always the last thing, right? so as you say, 1967 is lovey versus virginia. employment discrimination, 13 years after brown versus board of education. the supreme court had a marriage case on its bokt in 1956. but kicked it. because it didn't want to touch it with a ten-foot pole so waited for more states to come around. it's also the year that guess who's coming to dinner comes out. there's a cultural legal convergence. we're at that moment for the gay community now. one of the historians in the gay marriage trial, nancy kauts, a historian of marriage, she said one of the emancipated slaves after -- the slaves flocked to get married. s
roosevelt on the other hand, a very strong proponent of civil rights and doing something to end racial discrimination so she continually prodded roosevelt to do something. he decided that he would have one of these new destroyer escorts be manned by an african-american crew. white officers in an african-american crew. they went off in the battle of the atlantic and in fact they were recommended, the team was recommended for the navy and accommodation by their white captains. the navy didn't want these people in the first place and so, they decided they weren't going to give them accommodation. accommodation was not given to the surviving crewmembers, so 50 years later president clinton gave them their award. if you look at the ship and you think about it, the over 200 people in a of 35 feet wide and 200 feet long, it's pretty tight accommodations and if you look in the bunk room, you will see that there really aren't enough bunks for all the people. so you know, it was a tough situation, especially they would be out on the water for months at a time. they were smaller ships, so on the
. civil rights, prohibition. no one said we can't have this debate, the other side is too powerful. the difference is, in those debates, it was an ongoing discussion. now, when you tell people, let's talk gun control, the people for gun control, it's even. it strikes a cord in their head. oh, yeah, we should do that. it's an abstract contract. when you say gun control, he thinks of the gun, he can access his emotions more readily. it's more of an emotional issue. it's present and prevalent among the gun owners. >> that's right. i think the passion here is often disproportionate. the noise we hear in the media, the date that sticks out in my mind, the debate to me was 2000. look at the clinton clip and the record of the clinton administration on guns in the 1990s. what happened in 2000, al gore lost the presidency. democrats freaked out because he lost the states clinton carried. kentucky, west virginia, missouri, tennessee, his home state. how many jokes did he suffer about losing his home state. he walked away saying we don't want to talk guns because we don't want to alienate the
with you. >> my ministry, went through the civil rights movement, as you know. went to college and got a b.s. degree, first in my family, then a masters degree. then i worked three years at university tennessee. only black people out of 3,000 national scientists. that was a good experience for me. i came to washington in 1965 to head the student-run -- >> before the district had home rule or anything like that. >> so for 31 years, from school board to counsel at large, four terms as a mayor, another fourth term -- >> just re-elected. >> just re-elected. 16 years of mayor, it's a long time before anybody will come close to it. it's good if you do two terms, as you know, kennedy one term, and that's a trend now. this job is a different kind of job now. when i was in it, we had more resources. there's no textbook on being mayor so i learned the hard way by doing. i have been very, very successful in a whole bunch of programs. if you're going to look -- >> tell people about this. in 1980s. >> it was a sleepy, southern town with two or three-story buildings all over, including k street downtown
this the civil rights issue of our time, but many also express uncertainty that the high court isn't evolved enough to rule on. what's your take? >> well, i think that we certainly have seen a change in the tide from the president saying that his position has evolved on this to certainly the polls. the polls have indicated clearly that the american people have changed greatly in their posturing towards not just civil unions but the right to marry. so marriage equality is front and center. not only for millennials, but people of all age groups and all walks of life. you have democrats and republicans even agreeing on this issue. at this point, people are finding a common thread. that's the right for human beings, american people that look like you and i and eothers. >> matt, there are a variety of possible outcomes. let's start with doma. if that is struck down by the high court, thewill that be thed of conservatives' attempts of outlawing gay marriage? >> it is the mother of all federal laws to try to outlaw. it will be over it it's overturned. if social conservatives try to get smart about
important, as well as other civil and political rights. the ability of individuals to exercise rights and political -- rights of political participation, boating, speech, access to education on an equal basis, are important to getting at some of the underlying problems that create the conditions that we heard in this morning's program. the legal realm is another area in which it is important in some context, you are bringing a case, whether in a domestic court or an international forum, related to cyber, you want to know -- you want to know the definition, but i think focusing on it too much distracts us from other potential things. finally, another area in which a lot of the debate revulsed is in the area of act as a critic in activism -- is in the area of activism. whether rhetorically exaggerating the definition of slavery or minimizing the definition of slavery -- in many ways, it is quite right amiss -- in many ways, it is quite reminiscent of the term genocide. just as the trans-atlantic slave trade farm the image of slavery, the holocaust is the image that comes to the average
pherson "war on the waters" and craig, the civil war at sea, very handsomely done, are both out. that's good because we get to resume our -- we barely scratched the surface. let's get right to it because we spoke for an hour last time, we got to about january 1862. so i will assume you all know about 1861, and get to something that jim pointed out. that was rather interesting. is that 150 years ago this month, besides all the other things that were going on, the realization that lincoln had promulgated -- [inaudible] the union had commenced -- the tennessee cumberland and mississippi rivers seems to belong to the north, not the south. and i must've seen for a time in 1862 that the combination of events, particularly the successes of the union were about to end the war between the states. and then the trend line shifts. being the father of water that lincoln was now became vexed all over again. jim talent start with you. what happened and why? >> well, the union navy was on a roll in the fall and winter of 61 and 62, in the spring of 62. and it looked like they were going to open up the missi
." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. the bloody civil war in sir i wouldn't took a por more ominous turn with the assad regime might use chemical weapons against rebel forces. joining us, embassador michael oren. there's a report in the sunday times of london that israel has spotters on the ground in syria. what is your latest intelligence about assad preparing possibly getting ready to use chemical weapons. is he still mixing the gas we saw signs of this week or have the warnings from the president and secretary of state hillary clinton scared him off? >> we're watching the situation carefully. it's not new to us, syria has a varied, deep chemical weapons program, geographically dispersed. were the weapons to pass into the wrong hands that would be a game-changer. >> at this point any signs as to whether he's continuing to mix the gas or whether he pulled back? >> i can't confirm those reports but i can say we're watching it and we have a very clea
authorities, effectively extends civil liberties for anyone the government deems an enemy and keeps us in a permanent war footing in all kinds of ways. end this situation should be something that would appeal to both left and right. james madison, the author of the constitution, was clear on this topic. of all the enemies to public enemy, he wrote war is the most draw might because it comprises and develops the germ of in other. of all the enemies to public lynn earth war is perhaps the most directed because it compromise and develops the germ of err other. war is the parent of armies. in addition we have had the largest expansion of the federal government since world war ii. dana priest and will yaj arkin have documented that the u.s. government has built 33 new building complexes for the intelligence bureaucracies alone, occupying 17 million square feet, the equivalent of 22 u.s. capitals or three pentagons. the department of homeland security itself employs almost one quarter of a million people. of course, there are new branches out there. those terrorists should be captured or kil
constitution. the fact is that our constitution has been amended 17 times and always to expand rights and never to narrow them except prohibition that got repealed. what's the truth is that this is an issue that has taken hold. it's about civil marriage licenses. there's just been too many people that have now come out and, you know, thousands and millions of individual acts where the american public something the strategists did not anticipate back in 1996 is the american public shifts and as it has become comfortable, they have determined yes, these licenses should be extended. you know, the u.s. supreme court could determine this on narrower grounds, just on the california issue and just strike down doma. then we are left with nine states where you can marry and it would remain unresolved as to the other states. seasoning correct. >> if we are ever going to see civil marriage in alabama, it has to be the u.s. supreme court. i think we are living in an amazing era for gay people. hopefully the supreme court will understand its moment in history and like it has done before, come down on the si
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)